Feed on
Posts

Archive for February 2013

Half-BoundJournalBack.jpgThis weekend I spent way too many hours making books. Not that I made a lot of books but I learned to do things I haven't done before. For example, half binding is the book cover that has the corners and spine the same material but the main part of the book cover is of another material. I made three of those.

The picture above shows the third one. It is a 200-pages, lined journal, A5 in size. (Or, for my American friends 6.25 x 8.5 inches) Half bound, as you can see. Measuring is important. I keep saying that but it really is true: the corner pieces have to be the same size, the middle spine cover has to balance on either side of the spine and, of course, the middle bit has to reach under the corner and spine pieces. All very left brain.

HalfBoundBookOne.jpgBefore the third book, I made one from a recycled Ritz cracker box and this book. The front is simpler but the corner bits look better, I think, because the measuring was better. It is about 100 pages, lined, and the same size as the other. The lines of both books are both light red and light blue (they change color mid-page).

I have on my work table two more books I need to bind. One is a novel and the other is a lined journal with about 400 pages. The journal will be half bound (as the binder is half-baked), while the novel will be quarter bound (just the spine cover). Both will push my personal envelope by having print on the cover. Should be interesting.

00:0000:00

Read Full Post »

roundedback.jpgI just read a book about being a professional vs an amateur. One point the author made that was interesting is that a professional, no matter how successful she is, studies with a teacher. I thought about that. Tiger Woods, one of the best golfers in the world, has a golf teacher; Sir John Gielgud, one of the best actors of his generation, worked with an acting teacher, too. Another point the author made was that professionals never assume they know everything about their craft. Because they know they don't know everything, they have teachers.

Another item the author pointed out, was that amateurs can always find ways to procrastinate: cleaning their keyboards, organizing piles of paper, taking care of sick children. Professionals, he stated, worked. Which gets me to the planning stages. Amateurs can plan forever. Professionals take what comes and try to make the best of things.

roundedback2.jpgWhich gets me back to my bookbinding. I'm planning (ha!) on taking a couple of classes next month. One for rounded back binding (pictures here are not of my doing); and one of making book cloth. The books I've made in a workshop seem to be better than the ones I make by myself. Why is that? Is the presence of a teacher - even if that teacher is not teaching anything remarkably new - enough to raise the level of my bookbinding? Is that why Woods and Gielgud took classes? To improve? Great idea.

00:0000:00

Read Full Post »